February 2014

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Chief Vick (Kirsten Nelson, who also directed the episode) returns to Santa Barbara to say goodbye by announcing she’s taken a new position in San Fransisco. One group hug later, Lassiter (Timothy Omundson) rounds up Shawn (James Roday), Gus (Dulé Hill), Juliet (Maggie Lawson), and Henry (Corbin Bernsen) to investigate an unsolved 1967 homicide in order to impress Mayor Swaggerty (John Kapelos), whose uncle was the victim, and become the SBPD’s next Chief of Police. The cast does double duty by playing various roles in 60s flashbacks (including Hill performing as the lead singer of the lounge band) as Lassiter attempt to piece together the case with the help of the remaining living witnesses (Loretta Devine, Peggy Lipton) while becoming increasingly obsessed with solving the crime.

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Created by Mitchell Hammond, Batman versus The Terminator gives us a Dark Knight Returns-style Batman on the hunt for the Terminator in a future that draws some inspiration from the designs of the original Tron.

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After pretty much hating the first issue of Batman/Superman I’ve given the comic a wide berth and haven’t looked back. However, the recent cross-over with Worlds’ Finest involving the Huntress and Power Girl revealing themselves to this world’s versions of their relatives begins here so I found myself picking this issue up (along with Part 2 of the story in Worlds’ Finest #20 also released this week). I was pleasantly surprised.

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Doctor Pacman (Flash game) by maxtervamp

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Perception returns from its mid-season break with Kate Moretti (Rachael Leigh Cook) bringing Daniel Pierce (Eric McCormack) in on a case involving an autistic train-obsessed teen (Nate Hartley) who is facing murder chargers after he stole a train and ran over a train yard security guard (Andrew Lawrence). Although Pierce sees no intent in the young man’s actions he is forced to go to Donnie (Scott Wolf) for a legal excuse to save the young man from a life sentence (which turns out not to be necessary as the episode quickly abandons the autistic killer plot thread in favor of a more complex, but ultimately less original or interesting, murder).

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The Wind Rises

by Cap'n Carrot on February 28, 2014 · 0 comments

in Film

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Over a lifetime in animation Japanese film director Hayao Miyazaki has made a name for himself as one of the premiere filmmakers of his generation. Although I haven’t always loved his films, I found Princess Mononoke too bizarre for my tastes and a bit unwieldy with its 133-minute running time, it’s impossible to come out of any Miyazaki film without a profound respect for the talented man who brought them to the screen.

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While throwing Sara (Caity Lotz) a welcome back from the dead party, Oliver (Stephen Amell) also asks for Black Canary’s help to take the mastermind behind meticulously-planned robbery of Kord Industries of a skeleton key which can be re-purposed to break into any bank vault. While Felicity (Emily Bett Rickards) struggle with Sara’s inclusion in Team Arrow, her impressive skill-set, and Sara picking up her romantic relationship with Oliver, Felicity also attempts to find the Clock King (Robert Knepper) who always seems to be one-step ahead and have one more ace up his sleeve including hacking into, and destroying, the vigilante’s computer network.

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The other night Paul Rudd stopped by The Tonight Show to demonstrate his skills in a Lip Sync Battle with Jimmy Kimmel.

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ABC’s second attempt at a mid-season replacement in the same time slot (replacing the cancelled Killer Women), Mind Games stars Christian Slater and Steve Zahn as the Edwards brothers struggling to prove their start-up company can make good on its promise to control and manipulate fate to achieve their clients’ desired outcome. As premises go it’s actually pretty good, although the Pilot episode features a lot of the characters struggling to convey the idea to both investors and the audience and might do well to incorporate some slick CGI work to visually help get their point across (like Numbers, Intelligence, or a number of other shows).

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Have trouble finding the right words. Maybe The Every Occasion Card is what you’ve been missing. So now go and have yourself a Great Ass Day!

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