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Fired up on burgers and vodka, the boys take on this week in comics (and why we’re so in love with Mark Waid right now), DC’s new logo, the horrors of Rob Liefeld, and the wonder and glory of Ninjasaur, which you should go help fund via Kickstarter RIGHT THIS INSTANT.

Listen now or whenever you feel like it on iTunes!

And be sure to hit up the dadsbigplan Facebook page for some context around Bobby’s mind-boggling cap.

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Save me from re-imagined versions of classic characters. I don’t know what exactly I was hoping from Dynamite Entertainment’s new Voltron, but I guess having it make sense, have at least an once of joy, and not screw up the franchise was simply too much to ask.

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Dynamite Entertainment brings a new version of Flash Gordon back to comics. Although when I say new, this version of Flash seems to have quite a bit in common with the 1980 film by starring Sam J. JonesMax von SydowMelody Anderson,Timothy Dalton, Ornella Muti, and Brian Blessed.

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Matt Wagner‘s take on the classic tale of Zorro continues. Issue three follows three separate storylines. The first is Don Diego’s father still trying to come to terms with knowing his son is Zorro (and assuming shame is the reason why Don Diego has kept this secret from him).

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Kurt Busiek and Alex Ross, the team that gave us Marvels, reunite to give us a new story featuring the creations of Jack Kirby.

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From Dynamite Entertainment and writer Ande Parks comes a team-up (of sorts) between two of Dynamite’s biggest stars. Our story begins with an aging Don Diego de la Vega putting on the costume one more time when soldiers attack a nearby mission, and ends when news hits the comic’s other masked man that the hero known as Zorro is dead.

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It’s all here: the lone survivor of a massacre, a white horse, the faithful Native American companion, a silver mine to forge bullets, and a mask. Writer Brett Matthews‘ take on the western icon The Lone Ranger may not be for everyone, but it suits me just fine.

At the heart of the tale is John Reid, a man deeply conflicted with the death of his brother Dan, weighing his need for justice and revenge, and still searching for his place in the world. Our hero is still the man we know, he just doesn’t know it quite yet. The comic is harsher (mirroring the landscape and time period) than most depictions, and the stories often involve tough choices and a fair bit of violence with each issue.

The first 11 issues of Dynamite Entertainment’s ongoing Lone Ranger are collected here in the oversized hardcover volume complete with slipcover, an introduction from Matthews, a gallery of some pretty cool covers by John Cassaday, early sketches and character designs from artist Sergio Cariello, and the 2007 Free Comic Book Day story. The volume retails for $75, but with a little effort you should be able to find it online for less than $50.

The first two story arcs of the series include the birth of the Lone Ranger, his tumultuous relationship to Tonto (who is far more mysterious here than most depictions), his relationship to his brother’s wife and young son, and his quest for the man responsible for his brother’s death. The comic also takes several opportunities to show stories from other perspectives including that of its main villain, Butch Cavendish.

It’s a well-made volume and a steal at a discounted price. Fans of the hero should grab one up while they can, yell out a hearty Hi-Yo Silver, and enjoy the ride. The Lone Ranger rides again.

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