game of thrones

game-of-thrones-beyond-the-wall

The worst plan ever backfires on Jon Snow (Kit Harington) and his companions. Shocker! An indeterminate distance above the wall the attempt to capture a single undead soldier gets the entire group surrounded by White Walkers and their undead enemy. On an island, separated by the harsh arctic water, the group stills themselves for when the water re-freezes and the undead army can march once more. Despite the risk to herself, and the loss of one of her dragons to the enemy (okay, how cool was that last scene?), Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) rides to the rescues getting the remainder of the fellowship, other than Snow, out alive. There’s plenty of action here (although the show once again plays very loose with things like time and distance). Snow’s survival is also a bit unbelievable given the chain of events.

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Arya vs Brienne Lightsaber Duel | Game of Thrones + Star Wars

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Recreating Game Of Thrones’ Dragon Battle

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game-of-thrones-eastwatch

After her resounding victory of dismantling the Lannister army, Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) is left to dispense justice on the battlefield. The breaker of chains has no intention of taking prisoners, leaving the surrendering soldiers with the choice of serving a new queen or death by fire. Returning , the Mother of Dragons is granted to a surprise in seeing how Drogon responds to Jon Snow (Kit Harington), in another small moment the show continues to build the trust between the wary allies while keeping the truth of Jon’s paternity from the both of them… at least for now.

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game-of-thrones-season-threeAlthough events continue to meander through far too many separate storylines, Season Three of Game of Thrones begins pairing off some of our characters in unexpected ways. Together on the road, Brienne of Tarth (Gwendoline Christie) and Jaime Lannister (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) are more interesting than either have been separately. In much the same way, Arya (Maisie Williams) and the Hound (Rory McCann) make for amusing traveling companions.

In something which is beginning to become a pattern for the show, the season leaves its big event for near the end of the year. Season Three gives us the memorable Red Wedding in which we say farewell to some of the glut of supporting characters (although not necessarily all the right ones). And Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) begins to grow her army and legend. She gets some memorable moments, but sadly is destined to become mired in the show’s pacing and her journey home to reclaim her thrown will get put on hold for a good long while. Disconnected from all other threads, it seems obvious to everyone but the show’s writers that she’s the series’ standout character.

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game-of-thrones-season-twoGiven the ending of Season One in which Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) is literally reborn in fire while returning dragons to the world, I had high hopes for Season Two of Game of Thrones to raise its game. Sadly, this isn’t the case. Daenerys has become my favorite character, but due to circumstances beyond her control mean she spends nearly all of the show’s Second Season begging and whining (“Where are my dragons!”). Thankfully, by the end of the season, she seems to throw off her belligerent tantrums and take another step forward in her goal.

It’s the season’s penultimate episode which is the most memorable. While previously skirting around the larger battles around control for the Seven Kingdoms, the attack on King’s Landing provides the most action we’ve seen in the series so far. The episode also offers a big hero moment for Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage). I can’t say the same for the boring Stannis Baratheon (Stephen Dillane) whose goal to lay siege to the city ends in disaster thanks to Tyrion’s cunning and bravery.

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game-of-thrones-season-oneGoing back and watching a show for the first time well after it’s become popular is always going to give the view a different perspective than those who watched from the beginning. Game of Thrones has become of phenomenon over it’s six seasons (and counting), but examining the beginning of its run it’s hard not to feel somewhat mixed about the results (especially compared to the undying fervor of its fans).

Over ten-episodes we are told repeatedly that Winter is coming. As foreshadowing goes it’s not exactly subtle. By the end of the season Sean Bean has performed his perfunctory role (which fans of his know all too well), we finally get some dragons (pathetic that they might be), and things are just starting to get interesting. Winter, however, still feels far off. If Winter is coming, it’s taking the long road. The lack of a central protagonist also makes it hard at times to invest in events our their outcomes. Who should I be rooting for? The Starks? Jon Snow? The Targaryens? It seems only the Lannisters are hard-set as villains, although at least one of their member breaks that mold.

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A day in the life of someone who doesn’t watch Game of Thrones.

Shame of Thrones: A day in the life of someone who doesn’t watch Game of Thrones.

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Video Game of Thrones: Super Mario World

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KFC Capitalizing on Game of Thrones

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