The Flash

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The Flash‘s two-issue team-up with Deadman comes a close as the Scarlet Speedster fights off the Keystone Killer who discovers the hero is the perfect new host for the evil spirit. There’s less Deadman this time around and more dancing around the subject of Barry’s true parentage until the reveal that proves the teases were just that and that there is no blood connection between Barry and his mentor Captain Frye.

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After unintentionally releasing a spirit of vengeance and murder from his prison, the Flash teams up with Deadman to fight the Keystone Killer who plans on returning to his murderous ways by hunting down the surviving descendants of his original victims.

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Valentines, JL8-Style

by Cap'n Carrot on February 14, 2014 · 0 comments

in Nerdgasms

JL8, Yale Stewart’s weekly web comic featuring kid versions of the Justice League, now has some Valentine’s Day goodness to share. Enjoy!

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Writer Brian Buccellato delves into the Flash‘s past with the discovery of grave filled with the victims of the city’s serial killer from two decades ago. Barry does a little investigating on his own and discovers the timeline and the man’s choice of victim point to what he believes may be the real killer behind his mother’s murder (which his father is still serving a jail sentence for).

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Aimed more to a kid-friendly all-ages audience than the much more publicized Justice League: War release, and available only at Target (as a tie-in to the store’s JLA toy line), JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time proves to be a hell of a lot of fun. Rather than adapting an existing mini-series or comic arc (which seems all that DC has been interested in lately), Trapped in Time offers an original adventure from screenwriter Michael Ryan and director Giancarlo Volpe that’s a bit of a throwback to the old Super Friends days.

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The Flash #26 kicks off a new arc with a new creative team in writer Christos Gage and artist Neil Googe. It’s going to take a little time for me to get used the drastic artist change (and I’m going to miss those amazing splash pages from Francis Manapul) but issue shows definite promise, even if it does adopt the continuous use of the Flash’s incredibly lame yellow striping on his New 52 costume.

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As Moira (Susanna Thompson) returns to Queen Consolidated over Isabel Rochev‘s (Summer Glau) concerns, Oliver (Stephen Amell) investigates a break-in by one of Brother Blood‘s (Kevin Alejandro) enhanced soldiers (Graham Shiels) and Arrow gets one of its most prestigious guest-stars yet when a criminal scientist from Central City named Barry Allen (Grant Gustin) arrives in town to investigate the odd case. As Barry and Felicity (Emily Bett Rickards) work (and make goo-goo eyes) together, Oliver has Diggle (David Ramsey) look into the jumpy young scientist who hasn’t been completely honest with his personal reasons for coming to Starling City.

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The Flash #25

by Cap'n Carrot on December 2, 2013 · 0 comments

in Comics!

The Flash #25, a one-shot Zero Year adventure giving us Barry Allen‘s first meeting with Iris West in Gotham City, marks the end of Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato’s run on what for me has been one of the rare highlights of the New 52. In his final issue Manapaul shares the art duties with Chris Sprouse for a Flash adventure that happens well before Barry’s accident or his first run in scarlet-colored spandex.

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Issue #24 finally ties up the Reverse-Flash storyline (which, since it was teased for months before it ever began, seems like it’s taken nearly a whole year to get through) with Barry Allen taking back the power of the Speed Force Danny West stole from him to travel back into time and murder his father. Although co-writers Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato underline the moral of the story, and the reverse nature of the New 52 version of the character, he’s a far cry from the far more interesting original villain to use the name.

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Although (like most DCU characters since the New 52 reboot) The Rogues are merely shadows of their former selves, The Rogues #1 is a fair bit better than the wretchedly awful Reverse-Flash #1. Of course since The Flash has already spent time fleshing out the history of The Rogues and their unnecessary power-infusion, there’s actually not much for this latest Forever Evil tie-in issue to do.

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